August is the month of holidays, but there’s still lots to do if you’re staying in town for the summer. Check out our pick of four free events happening this month!

Barcelona Vegan Fair

This monthly vegan fair hosts stalls selling natural cosmetics and toiletries, tote bags, screen printed Tshirts and an abundance of cheap and delicious vegan food. The founder of El Hogar Animal Sanctuary will make a speech, and local musician Carlos Cassinello will be playing a set from 7pm. The venue is fully accessible and dog friendly, and best of all, entrance is completely free!

Saturday August 5th, 2pm – 9.30pm

The Takeover

This street art event unites artists from Barcelona and Berlin in taking over an urban space and transforming it into an art space over a two day period. There will be a series of live paintings as well as the chance to buy art from some of the artists involved, and a festival vibe with music and beer. As soon as the event is over, however, the art will all be painted back over, so go along to experience an ephemeral artistic moment!

Friday August 11th – Sunday August 13th

Festa Major de Gracia

The most famous festa major in Barcelona, this festival draws tourists from far and wide. There is a network of streets which transform themselves into enormous art installations each year, competing for the festival prize of best decorated street. There are lots of concerts, DJ sets and communal meals, along with the traditional correfoc and parade. It’s the 200th anniversary of the festival and is bound to be busy, so make sure you check out the decorated streets towards the start of the festival while they’re still in good shape! The festival has its own website detailing all the events closer to the time.

15th – 21st of August 

Giorgio de Chirico: Dream or Reality

This retrospective showcases the paintings of Giorgio de Chirico, Italian artist and founder of the metafisica art movement, which heavily influenced the surrealists. He is best known for his metaphysical period, and the work he produced during this time, from 1909 to 1919, is characterised by haunting images and brooding motifs. According to art writer Sanford Schwartz, De Chirico—whose father was a railroad engineer—painted images that suggest “the way you take in buildings and vistas from the perspective of a train window. His towers, walls, and plazas seem to flash by, and you are made to feel the power that comes from seeing things that way: you feel you know them more intimately than the people do who live with them day by day.” The exhibition is free for customers of Caixabank and on the first Sunday of every month, so get yourself along this Sunday for some dreamy Italian surrealist art. (Also, it’s air-conditioned…need we say more?)

Sunday 6th August